It Hasn’t Even Snowed Yet…

2015june13garden7…and I’m thinking about spring gardening.  How about you?

While I’m harvesting seeds for next year, pulling out finished plants and even planting fall and winter tolerant vegetables, I’m also starting to think about the spring garden.  Fall is a great time to add compost and soil amendments while you let it rest until spring.  As your compost breaks down, it recharges the soil beneath it with minerals and microorganisms that works it’s way down.  If you till, fall is a great time to plant cover crops that will be tilled into your soil in the spring.   Radish is really popular here.  We were slowly working toward raised beds so that we wouldn’t need to till, but I am starting to consider permanent 30″ flat beds instead.  Still no tilling, but no wood frames to worry about.

Growing up I learned from my grandfather to cover the garden and perennial plants for winter.  For us this meant raking the fall leaves onto the garden and around perennials.  In the spring we would turn them over into the soil.   I still do this, except I am getting13-11-08snowaway from digging or tilling.  Using a mower will shred them nicely, and if you have a bagger you won’t need to rake them.  Some people will cover their gardens/beds with straw or wood chips, still there are some who actually use tarps or other weed barriers.   A little work in the fall will greatly impact your garden in the spring.

 

Fall is also a great time to plan for garden expansions.  Covering areas you want to expand with compost materials and a tarp over the winter will choke out the vegetation under it and make your spring work a little easier.  I have a couple areas I’m considering expanding so I want to get the materials ready.

One area some might forget is cleaning up and caring for your tools.  This might mean things like applying boiled linseed oil to wood handles, sharpening, sanding, oiling metals so they don’t rust.  In the spring they’ll be ready to go when you’re itching to get out into the garden.

IMG_20161230_085416Another great fall prep is writing your thoughts down about this season into your garden journal.  (Of course you have a garden journal…any notebook or notepad will do.)  Give a summary about how things went, what worked well and what didn’t, what improvements or plant varieties you might like to try, weather challenges you had, pest battles, you get the idea.  This are things you can use as you start planning and prepping for next years garden.

A bit of work in the fall will get my spring garden going much quicker when the weather breaks.  I can’t wait!

Job 37:9-10 From its chamber comes the whirlwind, and cold from the scattering winds. By the breath of God ice is given, and the broad waters are frozen fast.

Until next time – live simply and love abundantly!  Grace and peace…

Ann’Re

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5 Favorite YouTube Channels

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I really love YouTube. So many times I’ve need to figure out something and there is always videos on YouTube that have answers.

While I have a channel on YouTube, I don’t use it to make and post my own videos anymore.  It just wasn’t something that works for me.  But I do follow quite a few amazing channels and thought I would share five of my favorites in no particular order or topic.

1. Darci Isabella – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3_A9yDRB1TMyah5CD0TfyQ

She is AMAZING and funny, and inspiring. She has a large family and minimalist lifestyle. As a hoarder (yes, I admit it) I soo, soo want to minimize and she has giving me lots of ideas and encouragement.

2. Townsends (James Townsend & Son)https://www.youtube.com/user/jastownsendandson

They are located near us and I first came across them at a local festival. While I’m not really into reenacting (although I could be persuaded!) I love all the recipes that are shared here, and have tried quiet a few of them. I also really like that videos are presented in 18th century costumes and settings.

3. Our Half Acre Homestead – https://www.youtube.com/user/TheMrsVolfie

Bev is so amazing and has so many helpful videos on all sorts of cooking, canning, crafting, and homesteading topics. She is very real and her videos are quite like you just popped in for a visit.

4. Appalachia’s Homestead with Patara – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXyRtDXzptYN56-UxNhYAbQ

I wish I could harness half her energy. lol I love her! Her channel is full of good and solid information on homesteading and raising animals and I’ve learned and applied so much from her on raising chickens.

5. Starry Hilder Off Grid Homestead – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqTGYxXH21MTYnMoOZGvX6A

While I have learned quite a bit from her, I admit that I just enjoy watching her. She is uplifting and encouraging, and I love seeing how well they live off grid and the beautiful scenery. If I were to live off grid, THIS would be how I would want it.

There you have it. It was hard to pick just five because there are so many great channels I enjoy including John Suscovich, Growning Your Greens, The Boss of the Swamp, One Yard Revolution, and one of my newest favorites Sounds Like Reign.

I hope you’ll check them out and let me know what you think. I’d also love to hear what some of your favorite YouTube channels are or even if you have your own channel, maybe it’ll become my new favorite!

Until next time – live simply and love abundantly!  Grace and peace…

Ann’Re

Anti-Inflammatory Diet Progress

The beginning of July I started my journey toward health after dealing with my joint pain (as well as my asthma) and it has been very challenging so far.

When I finally decided to make the choice to use food as medicine instead of going the conventional medicine route I knew it would be a challenge.  Even though we were already eating better, it is a huge change.  I underestimated how hard it would be.

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Greens from my garden are the bulk of my diet right now.

At first I started down the Autoimmune Protocol road, but the more I read the more I felt I needed to go down a different road.  The Paddison Program was specifically created for inflammatory arthritis so I thought that would be a better choice.  It goes further by eliminating most grains, all meats and oils.

Then it was my birthday.  I turned 50.  I took a day off from the diet and celebrated the milestone.  Shot a hole in all the progress I had made.  So I ended up started over.   This time hubby decided that he wanted to support me in this and go on the diet along with me.   (I love that man!!!)

Right now I’m on the pretty strict part of the diet that is designed to cleanse and heal the gut.  Once this part is over I’ll start reintroducing things into my diet to see how I react to them.  This will tell me what things are effecting me negatively and what things I have no problems with.

I have no idea how things will end up, but I am determined to see this through to avoid medication if possible.  It’s worked for others so it can be done.   It’s a tough journey and kind of isolating, but with hubby and son supporting me I’m already winning.

Harvesting has begun…

Aside from lettuces and herbs, and considering we planted late, we are finally starting to get a harvest from our garden. I also notices we have tomatoes starting to ripen and a few peppers that might be big enough to toss into tonight’s salad.

What are you harvesting?  What are you looking forward to?  Let me know!  Until next time – live simply and love abundantly!  Grace and peace…

Ann’Re
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Planning Long Term

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Grandma and Grandpa

I see a lot of people taking the plunge and moving to homesteads, going off grid, and generally moving to more sustainable, self sufficient living.  There are lots of benefits to these lifestyles that far out weigh the negative.

What some people don’t realize is that there can be a lot of hard work attached to these ways of living.  I wonder if these people who say they are in it for the long haul are just living day to day or are they really considering the long term?

My birthday is right around the corner.  It’s a big one.  A lot of the things we had hoped to do are starting to fade.  I am finding out now that my bad joint pain can be limiting.  The heat and humidity in the summer send my asthma into attacks.  While I consider myself in pretty good shape for approaching AARP age, I have to face the fact that I’m not a young anymore.  While I’m not yet out to pasture, now is the time to set things into motion that will make those years easier.

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Me with Hubb

We actually started thinking about it when we bought our house 12 years ago.
While we didn’t mind having a basement, we wanted a ranch style home so that if this is our final home we won’t have to worry about getting around it when we’re older.  This was important because we had seen older family members who were having a hard time with stairs including one who fell down a flight of basement stairs.  If we move, we will again look for something that will take us comfortable into our older years.  So, while we don’t want to limit ourselves, we also don’t want to make things harder down the road.  It takes thoughtful planning.  Gardening, raising animals, caring for the home and property…how will you handle these things in your older years? For example:  chopping all your firewood by hand isn’t as easy at 70 years old as it is for a 40 year old.

20141028_081817I know many of us are optimistic about these things in our later years.  “Oh, we’ll manage.”  Will you?  Even the average American lifestyle is challenging to the aged.  I’m not aged (*sigh*) and I have a hard time opening jars and bottles due to the joint pain in my hands.  I wonder how this will effect my gardening and canning?  How will this effect my butchering meat?  How will this effect my crochet business?

Have you thought about it?  Now is the time to plan and put things into place for your lifestyle long term that will make your older years easier.  It’s much easier to do it now while you are able than to wait until the day you find you can’t.

Until next time – live simply and love abundantly!  Grace and peace…

Ann’Re

Cauliflower

20170601cauliflower3I have been gardening most of my life. I don’t consider myself an expert, but I know what works for me and what doesn’t.

One thing I have not been very successful at growing is cauliflower. I’m not sure why. This year I thought I would try AGAIN and I am excited!  Silly, I know, but I have tiny little cauliflowers in my garden! *garden happy dance*

Until next time – live simply and love abundantly!  Grace and peace…

Ann’Re